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Nerve


You sort of start thinking anything's possible if you've got enough nerve.
J. K. Rowling


The story of J K Rowling's journey from state benefits to riches, unknown scribe to critically and popularly acclaimed author, is now one of legend.  It was, though, a far from easy journey which included rejection by 12 publishing houses who couldn't see why anyone would be interested in a little bespectacled, soon to be boy wizard.

William Blake was largely unrecognised in his lifetime, primarily making his living as an engraver.  Only a generation after his death was he appreciated as being a major influence in the written and visual arts of the Romantic Age.

Vincent Van Gogh was just beginning to build a reputation at the time of his fatal bullet wound, a reputation which, by the middle of the 20th Century, would see him recognised as one of the greatest and most popular painters in history.

These are all extremes and I would certainly want you to be successful (however you define that for yourself) in your lifetime.  But they all illustrate the point that as a creative person, especially if your work is innovative, recognition doesn't always come quickly.  It helps if you can be resilient and face rejection (Mark MacGuinness has written an excellent book, Resilience: Facing Down Rejection and Criticism on the Road to Successon just how to do this).  You have to believe in what you are trying to create even if no-one else does.  You have to learn how to hold your nerve.

Sometimes people will give you critical feedback (critical both in the sense of critique and in the sense of being important).  It can be very useful to hear what people have to say to you as it can help you to develop your ideas.  However, if what they tell you is counter to what you want to do, you need to be able to say, politely, thanks but no thanks.  Keep focussed, don't dilute your dream and keep pushing forward.

And who knows, one day I may be using you as an example of resilience and creative achievement.


If this has struck a chord with you and you want to find out if coaching will support you, book for a Light the Blue Touchpaper session.

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